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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)
the libel make markets more transparent, stable and efficient. from george washington university law school, and this is 45 minutes. >> good morning. i am paul berman, 19 of the law school as art said and i want to welcome you to this conference and obviously welcome mary schapiro, chairman of the securities and exchange commission. so one of the things that i think makes this law school, the george washington university law school distinctive and different from other top law schools is the degree to which we are integrated into the real world of law and policy practice in this country. so one of the things we are always striving to do this not be an ivory tower academic institution solely, but also one that is always trying to engage the practicing bar, people from corporations, people who are not lawyers in the educational enterprise and also when public policy discussions. obviously we have a great advantage in being in washington d.c. and having so much access to the world of policy. but in addition, it's not just the location. it has to be your orientation as a law school. so it is som
. my biggest concern was law enforcement but in law enforcement is the same thing. they are incredibly well trained and intelligent and good at their jobs so you better have an explanation for everything. the day i got pulled over they asked me you have been arrested, i have never been arrested in my life which is true but they searched the car and found drugs and i was a product of the system. it was irrelevant that the search was illegal. the drugs were in the car. they got the drugs off of the street but that has not been an effective strategy when you start looking at the drug war. >> so you are busted. some time later you have -- there's another legal issue that comes up. your back is against eyewall and that is when you get the knock on the door. you walk out and somebody says these are law enforcement people out here. i was arrested. >> i was arrested and scared straight. i decided i would rather be poor and free than half a little bit of money and not able to sleep at night. soaker two years i was on probation. i paid an attorney to $32,000 to get me off the hook and that is so
the existing law and involved in the in that examinations of the impediments to affect the resolution and we are working on a cooperative basis to overcome those. so in conclusion, dodd-frank is certainly given the significant new responsibilities to address these risks associated in the recent financial crisis. you take these responsibilities seriously and we are ready to use these authorities when they are needed. hopefully not. but while the key provisions are now in place, we are continuing to implement the remaining provisions in rulemaking and we continue to refine our thinking on the process we increase transparency in the rest of the market's on these powerful new tools and how they can best be used to maintain financial stability and end to big to fail. i look forward to participating in the q&a. thank you very much. [applause] >> now for the downside. first i want to thank you professor bachmann for organizing this. it's an excellent panel i must say and i've always enjoyed being on the panel with space and rick. laughter come i want to take on everything that was said, so let me g
delegation, six democrats. pennsylvania law speak to the apportioning process. the republican-controlled legislature essentially redrew the congressional boundary lines, moving some seats that were vulnerable in the eastern part of the state, three of them in at the philadelphia suburbs, one of them, one of them in the lehigh valley and one of them up in scranton. basically running the west and south to try to pick up more republicans without getting into the details of it -- karen lives in one of those areas where the boundary lines were redrawn. i do not know which congressman -- that might be in the 15th, with charlie dent. that was the lehigh valley seat. then out comes down to south central pennsylvania. or she could be in a seat held by a republican, lou barletta. that district was redrawn -- that district now comes the whole way down to the state capital, picking up more republicans. here is a way to think about that at the moment -- in competitive terms. nobody believes, independent analysts, nobody believes that of the 18 congressional seats, that more than two of the
our presenting event sponsor, the law firm of hush blackwell, and our media sponsors, ksdk news channel 5, st. louis public radio, and the st. louis business journal. ksdk is televising this broadcast live to its affiliates across missouri. st. louis public radio is affils across missouri. st. louis public radio is doing the same. the broadcasts is also been streamed live on ksdk.com and stlpublicradio.org. we also invite you to take part on social media on twitter. finally, our appreciation to the city police and fire department, as well as the school district of clayton for hosting tonight's event. before we begin, i'd like to review the debate format. each candidate will give a 3- minute opening statement and a 3-minute closing statement. next, our panel will ask questions of both candidates. both candidates will answer the same question and have one and half minute to do so. rebuttals will be at the discretion of the moderator and will have 45 seconds. after that, we will take questions from the audience, who received an index card as they entered the auditorium. they were a
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't ow his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where h
program, hundreds of degrees offered, 24 campuses, online world campus, academic health center, law school, 157 years of tradition. it is also in world that has continued to face ongoing controversy surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidenced by the attorney general's further charges level yesterday. today i want to tell you about my world, the realities of running an institution the size and scope of penn state while dealing with widely divergent perceptions. i want to share the wonderful law activities and accomplishments of our students and faculty and staff over this agonizing year. by any reasonable definition they are newsworthy stories but i understand you may not be willing to listen to them until we show you how this year has changed us. what have we learned about ourselves and what are we trying to do with that knowledge? i will speak candidly about how the last year has affected by in state and how the impact has gone beyond central pennsylvania to shape policies that colleges and
. it happens at the largest he jumped into is a church yard. my mother-in-law joked that was convenient. if anything went wrong we could wheel him straight on into the church. but he's doing very well. they're both doing really great and we treasure our time with them. general na is going every month to get video footage of her grandparents and telling stories and she wants to have that both for his library but also just for her and all of the family to have this footage of them because they're so terrific. now let's g get to what we're really here for which is to thank you all very very much and to encourage you to keep working every single day, keep going door to door and making those phone calls and make sure all of those people you contacted turn out to vote on november 6. it's really really important that we have the ground game that wins which and i think you all have set it up so that's what we'll have in michigan and i want to thank you all for that very much. i've been with ann romney lately. we did a reception together in oklahoma city and she is so terrific. and i think every
out of an airplane. it happens at the largest he jumped into is a church yard. my mother-in-law joked that was if anything went wrong we could wheel him straight on into the church. but he's doing very well. they're both doing really great and we treasure our time with them. general na is going every month to get video footage of her grandparents and telling stories and she wants to have that both for his library but also just for her and all of the family to have this footage of them because they're so terrific. now let's g get to what we're really here for which is to thank you all very very much and to encourage you to keep working every single day, keep going door to door and making those phone calls and make sure all of those people you contacted turn out to vote on november 6. it's really really important that we have the ground game that wins which and i think you all have set it up so that's what we'll have in michigan and i want to thank you all for that very much. i've been with ann romneywe did a reception together in oklahoma city and she is so terrific. and i think everyo
mother-in-law's from england and there's not a lot of support for her. we started talking about what happens when you get home because here she's been in emergency mode. this is one of the things we talk about, this emergency mode. she's been in emergency mode. there's the premature baby and now there's theurrane a the adrenaline's flowing and suddenly these going to go home soon and i said sometimes what can happen is you can have some anxiety, even depression, you should expect it. i could hear her voice starting to get shaky on the phone. she said i'm starting to feel that. and so then i very gently sort of suggested you need to talk to your doctor, there are things you can do. there are steps you can take. so we ended up talking about how the follow up was so important because i think in those situations charlie she's so focused on the baby. and on the emergency. and she wasn't really paying attention to her own emotions. of course postpartum anxiety and postpartum depression can be serious. >> rose: what kind of pieces have you been doing since. i saw that parts -- participato
many states that were trying to do a voter suppression with the idea laws, now we have won the most of that. now we have to be careful that the accurate count is given. everybody in the campaign has to be ready for recounting. if it goes to the supreme court, but we have to go there. host: are you still there? caller: it must be fair. host: from our twitter page -- steve is joining us from virginia on the republican line. caller: there is no such thing as a voter suppression, that is just silly. there is a voter fraud as was revealed by james keene where he recorded the son of jim moran telling somebody how to commit of voter fraud. there are lots of dead people that are registered. that was the purpose of this to get the dead people off of the voter rolls. the process is going forward in virginia. everybody who registers in virginia gets a voter i.d.. it is a responsibility. a lot of people did not want to have anything to do with responsibility. host: thank you for the call. eight romney ryan white house, it could happen. -- a romney-biden white house, it could happen. the magic n
, and we need to think about the risks they may post to other people. and lastly under current law before turn to part about health reform, i just would be remiss if i didn't point out in terms of access that there are some eligibility gaps in the snap. now be for some legal immigrants and unemployed childless adults who face a three-month time in a three month time limit has been suspended in most parts of the country during the recession. but basically if you don't have shown and you're between 18-29 you can only get food stamps, snap for three months. over a three-year period. if you're not working. and so that time limit will be coming back in the coming years and is really a serious weakness in the program. and we can talk, if people want to comment about what some of the other changes that are legislative the under consideration in coming, in congress right now. if folks want to go there but i'm going to skip that. most of what i want to talk about, looking forward to the next few years, what is the future of the snap access, and we were think as i said, about packaging step with ot
that is an important thing to remember. i have a budget of law at -- a little more than $1 million, which is a lot three-person like me. a cultural institution for an impact with the entire city -- that is not a -- not that much. museums are run on a higher budget. university colleges, professors in universities are on a bigger budget. the point is that if we want to solve this and realize we want to have more coverage, there are ways to do that. we have setup a society that knows how to find institutions with that kind of impact. the "texas tribune," we inspired them -- now they inspire us with their ideas and structure. >> they are treated from people from a "texas monthly magazine" wanted to focus on local politics? >> we were featured on the front page of the "new york times" after investigations we did. they told us, what can we do here? they decided they wanted to do an entity in austen that covers politics relevant to the entire state. now they're running on a $5 million budget. we are all talking at that. that is a lot of money for the -- not a lot of money for the type of impact that inst
indiscriminately and kill a lot of civilians, that's also a violation of international law. >> warner: but the threat of legal action offers no protection to these students, who now dream of what they'll become when they grow up. >> dentist. >> teacher". >> warner: no one can tell them when this war will end, what kind of country they will inherit, and whether they'll live to fulfill those dreams. >> brown: next, immigration may not be a front-burner issue for the presidential candidates right now, but it is something many voters care about in the swing state of iowa. paul yeager of iowa public television reports on how demographic shifts in his state are changing the political landscape. his story is part of our new collaboration with public media partners across the country from areas that will likely determine the outcome of the election in a series we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: last fall, in the run up to the republican caucuses, illegal immigration was a hot topic on the campaign trail in iowa. >> if you hire someone who is illegal, we're going to sanction you.
and strengthen laws. and the candidates should pay more attention to the issue. >> in this election, it's all about jobs in the economy. but for women, it's actually not just about getting a job, but it's about getting a job with fair and honest pay. >> with just days to go in the 2012 campaign, time is running out for equal pay to get equal play. athena jones, cnn, washington. >>> so just a heads up for you if you live in south carolina, you may be a victim of identity theft. ahead, the damage from the latest cyber attack affecting millions of residents and their credits. take close. ♪ atmix of energies.ve the world needs a broader that's why we're supplying natural gas to generate cleaner electricity... that has around 50% fewer co2 emissions than coal. and it's also why, with our partner in brazil, shell is producing ethanol - a biofuel made from renewable sugarcane. >>a minute, mom! let's broaden the world's energy mix. let's go. >>> it is certainly good to see you on this saturday. i want to show you five of the stories that we're really watching for you this morning. first of all, san
law obeyed in the second they saw was a rental car and a young kid, they pulled me over right away. he was the first time that a group the pattern that they looked for. and now of course they look for anything because the drug trade has become so profitable and lucrative. it's a $30 billion trade that anyone using anything, grandparents using rvs come to people in there as fishing boats and they go to the lake, doing anything because profits are enormous. so the cops are aware to look for that now. >> hipolito, how about your mexican background in relation to being able to infiltrate these groups? >> it was extremely important and yet i have to understand is that as soon as kind of thing that my spanish might not have been what it was from someone in mexico or central america when i was working on the cartels. the thing that it was brought out is the criminal element is not limited to hispanic american, but i was able to use my background again where i grew up, and seen some of the things that i grew up, so i was able to capitalize on my background, infiltrating. but what is important,
on shore about 30 miles from rehoboth to, in new jersey. my state, where my in-laws used to live, where my brothers and sisters live, they were hit pretty badly. i have a sister in law and family who live in ocean city, new jersey. you saw how badly they were hit. it is kind of amazing -- it is kind of amazing. a call yesterday with all the governors and mayors, it warmed my heart. you had the governor of delaware, the governor of connecticut, the governor of pennsylvania, democrats and republicans, and they were hurt. the governor of maryland. all saying to new jersey and new york -- look, if you need extra resources, we will send you ours. we will send you hours. listen on the telephone, hearing the mayor of the big city, not only mayor bloomberg, who is one hell of a fine guy, mayor bloomberg of new york. mayor booker of newark, hoboken -- hear these guys talking, they are all offering each other help. offering each other help. democrats and republicans, acting like democrats and republicans are supposed to act. [applause] ladies and gentlemen. we are always, i know this sounds almost t
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
rate of any country in the world. 2.3 million people. half of what we spend on law enforcement, the court and the prisons is drug related, and to what end. look, this is not about advocating drug use. 50% of kids graduating from high school have smoked marijuana. that's an issue that belongs with families, not in the criminal justice system. [applause] >> anybody have any rebuttal? >> i have to make my statements first, and then my rebuttal. so as a medical doctor previously in clinical practice for about 25 years, i can say with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to o
-thinking immigration policy. >> around the world waiting to come to this country and willing to respect our laws. i support legal immigration. i think we need changes to our immigration laws so that immigration is based more on talent and hard work and ability and skill so we have a pro-america immigration policy. with respect to children who are brocket here by their parents at the young age, i think we need a solution to the problem. congressman asked me last week if i had been in the house would i have voted. yes is the answer. the bill never made it through the senate. we need bipartisanship approaches i look forwarding with working with marco ruin ya to make sure a loss passes not that a single faction can pass something to the house. that's the difference between the house and the senate. the priority when i was there to secure the border. that's opened up opportunities to reform our immigration system. heinrich: wush of one of the thing things things is border patrol agencies to the board and hundreds of new custom about. that doesn't fix the underlying issue. we have proactive community. th
of issues with law enforcement, particularly the issue of creating a funnel for narcotics trafficking within 5 miles of the new mexico border. there are hundreds of new mexicans who have signed petitions that saying, please do not do this. you are ignoring them. you are not going to find a solution that way. >> let's move on to the next question. >> in 2007, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators reached a tentative compromise on immigration reform. but even with president bush's support, the compromise collapsed. most agree we need immigration reform. what reforms do yoou support? and how would you get the senate to approve immigration reform when such a bipartisan group could not? representative wilson. >> it is separate from border security. the united states has to have effective control of our borders. the number of people crossing the border illegally has gone down because of the resources that we put in there since 2005. that is a good thing. the people who are still crossing tend to be heavily armed narco traffickers and human traffickers. it's very dangerous. with respect to immigratio
the role of the criminal law in drug control policy as much as possible while protecting health and safety. >> despite all that evidence we're beating our heads against the wall. we have presidential candidate who act original in their thinking, but when they get in, they become carbon copies of their predecessors. what is it about the political inability or the public unwillingness to support issues. >> it's very hard and unusual for the president to lead. look at gay marriage, you provided leadership, and then years later president obama said me too. he's following. in '53, fdr didn't lead, he followed the rest of the country. obama came in. he had made three commitments when running for president four years ago. he said i'll roll back the federal war on marijuana. i'll change these mandatory penalties and allow federal funding for needle exchange. lo and behold he made good on all three in the first three months and then he backed away. first because the republicans became in control and then the old forces got back in there again. i'm hoping he'll have a second term and have something
, is on the better loss for adoption. -- better laws for adoption. we should encourage adoption in the united states of america with federal laws here in the state capital. and taxpayer funding of abortion -- our tax dollars should be used to fund medicare, and social security. and funding the military. they should not be used to fund abortions. sherrod brown is an extremist on the issue and supports using your tax dollars to fund abortion. we should not support abortions in the ninth month of pregnancy. but sheriff brown has an extremist position. can you explain to the people watching at home tonight, why do you support abortion in the ninth month of pregnancy. >> i have never heard anyone say that to me, judge. unlike judge mandel, -- josh. unlike josh mandel, my opponent has an extreme position and signed the exceptions for anything, rape and incest. i trust women to make decisions about their own health care. there are tens of thousands of women who get pregnant from rapes every year. it may not be something we want to acknowledged in the end, i will trust of high women to make -- i will trust
nobody speaks about the intelligence blunder the republicans did that put us in a war with raq, law 2000 american soldiers, and their answer was they had poor intelligence. secondly, my question is, why should anybody believe that governor romney would be good at creating jobs what he was 48 in job guest: well, i'll take the question first. governor romney in the middle oh f a tough economy created almost 50,000 new jobs in massachusetts. let's remember. >> on "washington journal" tomorrow morning we'll look at virge. >> now we'll go to jacksonville florida where mitt romney is to speak shortly. he is with jeb bush. >> you ready to take back the white house? i thought you might be. how did you enjoy five for fighting? he's a really good guy. did you enjoy his song "freedom never cries"? this is an important election. this an election about what the future of america is going to be. is our future going to be more debt and more regulation and more taxes? sor our future going to be in less taxes, less regulations and. nibble mitt romney. he's the right candidate at the right time to be
and accomplish was to change campaign finance law. something like the disclose act, which -- the system is broken. it is broken like a broken arm. it is not terminal, but we need to fix it and i would like to be part of that. there is way too much money in politics. when i see these ads on tv i am seeing them for the first time. these are not organizations that i am connected with. in terms of the advertising. >> mr. king, i have a question about taxes. let's say in 2013 you are appointed tax czar to establish u.s. tax policy. what would you do? >> i have opposed the czars, but it would be a tempting appointment -- the first thing i would do is make the bush tax brackets permanent so there is long-term predictability. then i would go to work to sell to the public the idea that, as ronald reagan said, the federal government has the first lien on productivity and punishes production -- we remove all taxes off of production and put them on consumption. we can transform this policy. that is a piece i have gone around and talked about. i've talked about it each year i have been in congress. i asked mr
. this is sears. . roker cops above the law these allegations were filed by a bunch of cover up officers. you say there were constantly harassed they should leave their jobs because their career in law enforcement was over, they claimed it was in retaliation. >> a couple of veteran undercover officers who claimed they did their jobs all too well and paid the price now they are suing clamming ongoing harassment from their fellow cops in supervisors widespread abuse of police power. we death threats from people of the highest level of the chicago police department. it's truly a despicable case their lawsuit names the city all the way up to the level of deputy chief the claim that while working undercover investigating allegations of corruption against other cops they founded, police directly involved in a drug train being paid to look the other way like in the well-publicized mahomet case a veteran tactical officer who admitted shaking down drug dealers for cash some of them it turned out were working for the fbi police officer say when they did their job uncovering cops turned criminals they were
in giving back. we have done that you are life. my husband is in law enforcement. for many years i was an investigative reporter and fought public corruption. i spent the last 10 years of my career in health care, making sure it is accessible and we offer quality health care. this election will get down to parties i see this is a different set of priorities from where my husband and i come from and from what congressman schilling stands for. i pledge to give it my all and work on behalf of the middle class families that have been under attack by the last two years of congressman schilling's tenure. we have to make sure progress are there for students to go to college and the balance the budget with the right parity. not on the backs of the middle class but with the middle-class in mind. thank you very much. >> now it is time for questions from the panelists. >> welcome to both candidates tonight. congressman schilling, you are from colona and ms. bustos, from east moline/ those cities are 7 miles apart yet members will have to represent a district that is over 85 miles wide. how wo
and colorado do as far as the gun laws. we on the editorial board at "denver post," we supported reauthorization of the weapons ban and we support the elimination of the high-capacity magazines that people use for those guns. there's a point made here by the democratic gov. which is that gun-control laws will not stop someone who has an ill intent from acting on it. it's a difficult position for democrats, particularly in the west where second amendment rights are held tightly by voters across the spectrum. democrats have learned in colorado across several election cycles that running on gun control is not a winning proposition for them. we saw several pieces of legislation passed in colorado after the columbine massacre, but since that time politicians, especially on the left, have been loath to take part of the issue. republic host: in color from st. augustine, fla. -- republican caller. caller: i would like to see them spending more time letting people know about other things going on in the government and have been mentioned. the activities that they talk about are not necess
coming up >> law enforcement agencies are out making that october 31st registered child offenders cannot have halloween decorations. that is impacting the family and even after they have off probation. we will have more on this at 8 and the reminder that trigger treat chaperones stay safe. only approach homes with a light on and stay in groups. >> more coverage of the world series champions. and the san francisco police have this are rest with the vandalism of a public minibus toward the celebration the arrests. >> the rain staying away from the parade but not for the trick or treaters. it could be pressing south what to expect, coming up. >> announcer: the kron 4 news at 6:00 p.m. starts now >> the san francisco giants and their fans showed their love for each other. it is a sea of black and orange. the ceremony at city hall. this world series championships the giants are winning their second title in three years. this parade down market street. hundreds of thousands of giants fans packed into the city. showing off their team spirit. >> did you skip work? >> yes. >> because i love the g
. in the case of nepal, what we've done is appeal to the mother-in-laws. the mother-in-laws are the ones who control things as to how that birth is going to go. we talk to them this them about the health of their grandchildren, and of course they want healthy grandchildren. then we teach them why it is so important to give birth in a clean place clean sheets. that's one example and every country has something a little bit different about the cultural traditions. you really have to work at the community level of people who live there and understand. a lot of our staff are from these communities. they know the culture, the tradition, and try to change those from within. >> gavin: in the united states, most your efforts on the health side are where? >> we actually work in two big areas. health and education in the u.s. in the united states it's all along the southern part of the united states. and it's really in the poorest communities primarily rural communities. on the health side, the big issue in the u.s. is childhood obesity. we work a lot in that area. >> gavin: in what ways? prevention a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)

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